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fauxklore
18 December 2015 @ 11:58 am
I still work for the same company, as I have for over 30 years. But the short attention span method of career planning kicked in, which has me moving around every 4-6 years. My theory is that the first year, you are lost and learning your way around. The second year, you are functional. After that, you get to the "I've done this all before" phase and after a while you need to move on to keep from being bored.

That does, of course, assume you are the sort of person who needs a lot of stimulation in life. There used to be a management model that referred to the "T-shaped person." That meant that you can have a lot of breadth, while still having depth in one area. The concept is that the legs of the T vary from person to person and you need to balance those to have an effective staff. I suspect that model is not taught any more, as I've had to explain that to people I've mentioned it to. At any rate, I still find it a useful way of thinking about career planning. I have a broad top bar to my T.

In this case, I hadn't really been seriously looking yet. I had a phone conversation, however, which ended with a "by the way, would you consider coming to work for me" question and a few follow-up conversations with other people. Then there was the whole corporate process stuff, of course, so it all took a while.

I thought I had gotten a lot of the logistics moving before I went on vacation, but came back to find that it was going to take a while to get some things. Like the computer still isn't delivered (I am using a loaner laptop which took a few days in and of itself). It took until yesterday to have a phone line. But slowly slowly things are becoming functional. I do have a couple of more accounts that need to get set up. And some time in January, I need to do a "grip and grin" type trip to meet some more of the customer folks.

I'm also starting to do actual work.

I think this will be a good move in the long run, but the initial phases are always a challenge.
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